Whose history is this? Multivocal narratives of Roman archaeology

Organisers:

  • Karl Goodwin (University of Kent) k.a.goodwin@kent.ac.uk
  • Antony Lee (University of Durham) antony.m.lee@durham.ac.uk

Historical narratives play a significant role in the creation and denial of both past and modern identities. A key aspect within the study of historical creations and their role within modern society is how they are constructed, what factors influence representations, who the targeted audience is, and which voices are being simultaneously incorporated and denied when conveying a version of history.

Many historical narratives take place within museums, heritage sites, and schools; these spaces are all public but simultaneously governed. This session asks whether historical narratives are in fact governed, if so by whom, and what the implications of this relationship are. Additionally, historical narratives are distributed to the public through media which may not appear governed in a physical sense such as films, games, and fiction books. The range of dissemination and communicative techniques is therefore broad and far reaching, thus placing importance on its study in academia.

Papers are invited to discuss topics which include:

• How Roman archaeology is used within historical narratives
• How interpretations of the Roman period can shape contemporary identities and reflect, relate, and influence present-day politics
• Which voices are included or denied within the retelling of Roman history through archaeology
• Whether Roman archaeological research is being used responsibly within the public sphere.

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